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Lather up with local artisan soap: interview

Posted by BoB Henninger on 9/4/2016 to News

See (Visit) phillyBurbs.com for the review or read it below.

 


 


Lather up with local

artisan soap:

interview part 1

 

By: DAVID
RAUCH

Burlington County Times

 

By: David Rauch

FRIENDLY Fumes makes the definition of hand-made products. Based out of his wooded, Montgomery County home, Bob Henninger crafts artisan soap for an international market. His all-natural approach and emphasis on community-support has made him desirable to the growing market of conscious consumers. I sat down with Bob to see how one can turn an interest into a lucrative business.

 

David Rauch: Could you tell me what your company does and how you got started?

Bob Henninger: What we make is handmade products. I started off wanting to make fragrances, perfumes and soap. I didn't know there was an online community of soap-makers. I started from a book and just did recipes. I, along with the rest of the country, have gone to soy-based products People started asking for candles, and they were also asking for lotion, so whatever they asked for, I made. I use total, 100% natural essential oil soap.

DR: How did you get started? Do you have another job?

BH: I work at a spin off of Ford motor company. I just see that automotive is really bad, so this company is me trying to prepare something for my retirement, something I like to do. Our plant had 2,500 hourly employees, now there are around 200. So, I may get to retire, I may not. However, this is what I want to do.

DR: What does working with essential oils mean?

BH: Essential oils come directly from nature. Some people are sensitive to synthetic fragrances that larger corporations may use as opposed to essential oils. 
My fragrances start with a base of essential oils, and my perfumer builds it up. My big point was to get rid of a plasticizer called Phthalate [a multifunctional chemical used in consumer and personal care products]. Everything coming in is Phthalate-free.
Essential oils come from some varied part of a plant. It could either be bark, leaves, branches or roots. They're usually steam-distilled. For example, Lavender is picked in the morning, then it's put in steamers. They boil water underneath, push steam through the lavender, the oils go out in a little distillation, and the pure oil comes into a collection pot.

DR:  How many fragrances do you have?

BH: I have over 200. Right now, I have 80 different soaps, but between the soap, the candles and the lotion, I have over 200 fragrances.  I'm starting to get into mixing the fragrances myself. I have 200 fragrances in the other room, and now, I feel comfortable doing the blending. 

 

To read more interviews with local artisans and culture-makers, check out my Raison d'Etre blog.

 

To see more information and buying information, check out friendlyfumes website.

 



 
Rating: 5.0 of 5.


================================================

 
Lather up with local
artisan soap:
interview part 2 
By: DAVID
RAUCH
Burlington County Times
By: David Rauch
FRIENDLY Fumes makes the definition of hand-made products. Based out of his wooded, Montgomery County home, Bob Henninger crafts artisan soap for an international market. His all-natural approach and emphasis on community-support has made him desirable to the growing market of conscious consumers. I sat down with Bob to see how one can turn an interest into a lucrative business.

David Rauch: Could you tell me what your company does and how you got started?

Bob Henninger: What we make is handmade products. I started off wanting to make fragrances, perfumes and soap. I didn't know there was an online community of soap-makers. I started from a book and just did recipes. I, along with the rest of the country, have gone to soy-based products People started asking for candles, and they were also asking for lotion, so whatever they asked for, I made. I use total, 100% natural essential oil soap.

DR: How did you get started? Do you have another job?

BH: I work at a spin off of Ford motor company. I just see that automotive is really bad, so this company is me trying to prepare something for my retirement, something I like to do. Our plant had 2,500 hourly employees, now there are around 200. So, I may get to retire, I may not. However, this is what I want to do.

DR: What does working with essential oils mean?

BH: Essential oils come directly from nature. Some people are sensitive to synthetic fragrances that larger corporations may use as opposed to essential oils.
My fragrances start with a base of essential oils, and my perfumer builds it up. My big point was to get rid of a plasticizer called Phthalate [a multifunctional chemical used in consumer and personal care products]. Everything coming in is Phthalate-free.
Essential oils come from some varied part of a plant. It could either be bark, leaves, branches or roots. They're usually steam-distilled. For example, Lavender is picked in the morning, then it's put in steamers. They boil water underneath, push steam through the lavender, the oils go out in a little distillation, and the pure oil comes into a collection pot.

DR:  How many fragrances do you have?

BH: I have over 200. Right now, I have 80 different soaps, but between the soap, the candles and the lotion, I have over 200 fragrances.  I'm starting to get into mixing the fragrances myself. I have 200 fragrances in the other room, and now, I feel comfortable doing the blending.
To see more information and buying information, check out friendlyfumes website.

Rating: 5.0 of 5.


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